The Science of Cocktails

    The Science of Cocktails

    For years now, chefs have been delighting diners with their scientific culinary creations. Innovators like Ferran Adria have become famous for their kitchen experiments that result in show-stopping dishes.

    At Barmini, celebrity chef José Andrés’ very own “cocktail lab” located in Washington D.C., the staff is always experimenting with cutting-edge techniques under the guidance of Coronado, the group’s lead cocktail innovator and head mixologist. Smoked spirits, sugar spun drinks and cocktails garnished with creations from a Heidolph rotary evaporator are just a few of the elements used to craft some of the 110 menu offerings.

    “This is what I love to do," Coronado said. "This is my pleasure. I want to turn cocktails into an art. Everything I do, eat, drink, smell, I try to apply to my craft. If I go to a restaurant, I have to come out with three great ideas for cocktails.”

    Born in the Dominican Republic, Coronado moved to the United States with the hopes of putting an engineering degree to good use. Instead, he found his calling in the food and beverage world and enrolled in the Culinary Institute of America. He became a certified sommelier, champagne and spirits expert. At Barmini, Coronado is in charge of developing a bar program that changes the way we think about cocktails. 

    “As head of R&D for ThinkFoodGroup, I am always thinking of how to make something different, make it better," Coronado said. "I take inspiration from my everyday surrounds. Life is R&D.”

    Next, how Coronado develops those signature drinks...

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    A childhood favorite turns into a new adult delight.